Fall 2017

Features

  • 13

    ON PENSION PLANS AND PJS

    MARION POLLACK

    Fewer than 40 per cent of working people in Canada have workplace pension plans. A lot more needs to be done for everyone to have a secure retirement.

  • 17 COVER STORY

    A FOOD POLICY FOR CANADA

    Melissa Keith

    Food is an issue that leaves no one untouched. Who eats, and what they consume, is a highly political subject: why a national food strategy, not stopgap measures, is essential.

  • 24 PHOTOSTORY

    THE POWER IN A PHOTOGRAPH

    VINCENZO PIETROPAOLO

    Taking up a position with a camera means taking up a political position. It means choosing which side you’re on.

  • 33

    THE LOCKOUT OFFENSIVE BY EMPLOYERS

    Linda Briskin

    More and more, employers are using lockouts to enforce concessions and weaken unions.

Departments

  • 6

    NOTES

    Yolanda McClean Wins Award * Chinatown and Strathcona * BC Labour History Bronzed

  • 9 Webwork

    MILLENNIALS, PENSIONERS & WORKAMPERS

    Derek Blackadder

    Amazon’s “Workampers” program takes the exploitation a step further by recruiting American seniors who are destitute in retirement.

  • 11 CLIMATE/JUSTICE

    THREE ISLANDS AND A SACRED OBLIGATION

    JAMES HUTT

    One only has to look at Ottawa’s Chaudiére Falls to observe how easily Canada disregards its sacred obligations.

  • 15 Working for a Living

    Travelling the Gig Economy

    MARTIN WALDMAN

    After years of visualizing travel destinations and planning potential routes, the stars had aligned to live out the “digital nomad’s” life.

  • 43 HAVE YOU SAY

    BURKAS AND BILL 62

    Archana Rampure

    The test of human rights is actually when we are forced to confront the humanity of people who are most unlike us.

  • 44

    POETRY

    Jamie Lupia

    A historical retelling that transcends time, this storybook is a must-read, for children and adults alike.

  • 46 REVIEW

    THE STORY OF ALBERT JACKSON

    Review by Mark Brown

  • 48 COMMENTARY

    FOOD, LAND AND TREATY

    SHERRY PICTOU

    Indigenous women’s knowledge and experience must be central to any decolonization process with settler-society.